Announcements:
Scott Aitkins of the Salvation Army Kettle Campaign has asked members to participate. See contact info and instructions below:
 
We are efficient about getting our donations out to: Violence Against Women Services Elgin, The Grace Cafe, the Salvation Army, Caring Cupboard (St. Thomas Elgin Food Bank), Christmas Care, Inn Out of the Cold and Habitat for Humanity.  Pictures below of  Connie Davidson, Board member for Community and Trudy Kanellis, Board member for Youth and Foundation.  The photos were copied from Trudy's post on our Facebook page.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Re Totes for Teens: We have been asked by the Railway City Rotary Club to participate. Motion at this club meeting to "to accept RCRC invitation and in a joint project with them, to contribute $250 to the Totes for Teens project." Carried.
 
Also, Scott Carrie, president of the RCRC asked for support with lights at the splash pad, Pinafore Park (Virtual Santa Clause Parade). We will wait for more info from President Gerry.
 
Interactors contributed $300 to Inn out of the Cold. BRAVO. Turkey raffle tickets ($2 each or 3 for $5) are on sale from Adrianna and Trudy; Trudy takes e-transfers (that's a great example of how the group has adapted to COVID!)
 
Nancy reported from the District Assistant Governors meeting:
The District Conference 24Apr21 will have an Environmental theme with a focus on Care of the Great Lakes. The Environment is now the 7th area of focus for Rotary worldwide. There will also be a focus on 50 years of Rotary Youth Exchange. The last District Zoom event (with a focus on Education) this year will be late in December. The January District Zoom meeting will centre on Grant Certification. Each and every club should have a strategic plan; this comes from the District Governor David Elliot nominee who would like clubs to focus on this. Our DG nominee is Mike Chaffey from Flint, Michigan. The Rotary Youth Leadership Awards (RYLA) will be virtual.
 
We heard examples of how we can help people as we go about our day. Trish saw Angie from the "Tuna Tuesday" group that Trudy volunteers in; she was giving a backpack full of toiletries/clothes etc to people in downtown St. Thomas. Barbara carries white socks to give away (white preferred as the socks don't stain if they get wet). Nancy's daughter gives toiletries away from her car.
 
Guest Speaker Reverand Michael Wellwood, Chaplain with the Canadian Armed Forces for 27 years, was introduced by Barbara Warnock.
He made the transition from Father to Padre to Chaplain when he joined the forces. Chaplaincy Corps has existed since the middle ages; it is an honourary rank such that a Chaplain has the same rank as the person he/she talks to. Padre means "Father" and as such is a reference to the position in the Catholic faith. A Chaplain serves on behalf of all faiths. Rev. Wellwood had a church of people from many faiths, while living in a tent with soldiers. If a soldier of faith came to him for support, he sought the nearest compatible faith counsellor.
He has seen enemy fire but was never armed as Chaplains don't carry weapons. He did carry a Geneva Convention card that he could present if captured by an army signatory to the convention. Days were long as troops on duty secured their own safety while advancing. The Maltese Cross was the symbol he wore on his hat; that symbol has now been replaced by the symbol of the faith of the person bearing the hat. Women, as we all know are in the Service, and as such can be a Chaplain.
Rev. Wellwood was separated from his wife and children for long months at a time; that made life stressful for the family. He has helped others in the military with that problem and other problems like alcoholism. Rev. Michael served in Cypress while troops kept the peace between Greeks and Turks as they disputed a territory. Also, he served to deliver social action to Serbs in Bosnia (material goods and in orphanages). He especially remembered the double-distilled plum brandy. At Georgtown/Cornwallis he taught life/survival skills to new recruits.
At age 49, he retired from the military and spent 20 years with the parish. Thank you, Michael, for your many years of service!